Category Archives: Chicken Challenge

NM Grasslands

Take the Chicken Challenge | Prairie Habitat

NM Grasslands

Lesser prairie-chickens need large expanses of prairie with diverse grasses, forbs and shrubs for all aspects of their lives as seen in this photo of New Mexico. Photo: Andy Lawrence.


This Chicken Challenge focuses on the prairie habitat where lesser prairie-chickens live. Test your knowledge of lesser prairie-chicken habitat with the quiz below. Good luck!


Fun Facts:

  • The lesser prairie-chicken lives in five states in the southern Great Plains: Kansas, Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico and Colorado.

 

  • Lesser prairie-chickens require large expanses of native prairie habitat for their life cycles. Habitat fragmentation by roads, residential and industrial development and conversion of prairie to cropland are two of the biggest threats to prairie-chicken habitat.

 

  • In addition to large, intact landscapes, lesser prairie-chickens need habitat with a diverse mix of plants that include grasses, forbs and shrubs.

 

  • Prescribed grazing practices can help improve habitat for prairie-chickens by fostering the diversity of plants that prairie-chickens need. Fence marking can help mitigate collisions when temporary or permanent fencing is used for prescribed grazing management.

Take the Chicken Challenge | Prairie Habitat


 

Take the Chicken Challenge | Conifers

Nebraska is on the front lines of an eastern redcedar invasion as illustrated by this photo from the Loess Canyons area. Photo by Dirac Twidwell, UNL


This Chicken Challenge focuses on conifer trees, which are causing a cascade of negative impacts to grassland and sagebrush range across the West. Try the quiz and see what you know about these impacts.

Fun Facts

  • “Conifer” refers to any plant that produces cones. Some conifers, like pine trees, have easily recognizable cones. Others, like the Pacific Yew, have a fleshy cone that looks like fruit and yet others, like juniper trees, have cones that look like berries. The word conifer is a compound of the Latin words for “cone” (conus) and “to bear” (ferre) and directly translates as: “the one that bears cones.”
  • Most conifers have needles for leaves, but not all conifers keep their needles year-round. For example, the bald cypress which grows in southeastern swamps loses its needles each winter and tamarack or larch trees have needles that turn a golden yellow in the autumn before dropping to the ground.
  • Conifer trees like pinyon pine, juniper, and mesquite have always been present on sagebrush and grassland landscapes but have been expanding into areas where they didn’t historically grow over the last 150 years.

Take the Chicken Challenge | Conifers


 

Pronghorn. Andy Lawrence photo

Chicken Challenge | Pronghorn

Pronghorn. Andy Lawrence photo

Pronghorn. Andy Lawrence photo

Fun Facts

  • The Latin name for pronghorn is Antilocapra americana, which means “American goat-antelope.” But pronghorn aren’t related to goats or antelopes; instead they are the only surviving member of Antilocapridae family, a group of animals that existed in North America during the Pleistocene epoch. It’s believed that pronghorn have been in North America for a million years.
  • Adult male pronghorn weigh between 85 and 150 pounds; adult females weigh 75-105 pounds on average.
  • The horns of pronghorn have characteristics of both horns and antlers. Antlers are made of bone and are shed each year. Horns are made of keratin and are never shed. Pronghorn horns have both a bony interior and a keratin sheath that is shed each year. Females also have horns, but they are smaller than those found on males.
  • Pronghorn typically breed in September or October and females give birth in late May, often to twins. Newborn pronghorn hide in grass for the first few days of their lives, nursing from their mother. They join the herd after a week or two.

Take the Chicken Challenge | Pronghorn


 

Photo of lesser prairie-chickens on a lek, with ranch operations visible in background, photo credit: Laura Erickson

Chicken Challenge | Test Your Knowledge of Ranching

Photo of lesser prairie-chickens on a lek, with ranch operations visible in background, photo credit: Laura Erickson

Lesser prairie-chickens on a lek, with ranch operations visible in background. Laura Erickson photo.


LPCI’s work is focused on private lands – working ranches and farms across the southern Great Plains. These lands are critical to lesser prairie-chickens and to the hundreds of other species that rely on healthy grasslands. Privately owned ranches also help maintain open spaces, often bordering and operated in common with public lands. Test your knowledge of ranching with this Chicken Challenge.


Fun Facts:

  • Agriculture is one of the nation’s largest employer with more than 23 million jobs involved.
  • Raising beef cattle is the single largest segment of American agriculture.
  • U.S. ranchers produce 18% of the world’s beef with only 8% of the world’s cattle.
  • 85% of the land where cattle graze is not suitable for raising crops, thus grazing animals on this land increases the amount of food produced.
  • All “cows” are female. The males are called bulls or steers.
  • Water is precious in the arid West. Only 2% of the West is considered wet habitat. Of that, more than 75% is on private land.
  • The Lesser Prairie-Chicken Initiative has worked with more than 800 landowners to voluntarily conserve more than 1.6 million acres of land.

Take the Chicken Challenge | Ranching